2019, 2019 Northeast Bankruptcy Conference

The Honorable James F. Queenan, Jr. Seaside Chat

$50.00
$50.00

Practice Pointers: When Bankruptcy and Consumer-Protection Statutes Collide

The same circumstances that lead debtors to bankruptcy often give rise to claims under various consumer-protection statutes. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s mortgage-servicing rules, and similar consumer-protection rules and statutes can have substantial impacts on the creditor/debtor relationship.

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$50.00

Are Trademarks Really That Special, or Did Congress Just Miss Something?

The First Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Mission Product Holdings Inc. v. Tempnology LLC held that the absence of trademarks from the definition of intellection property in § 101(35A) of the Bankruptcy Code means that, unlike other types of intellectual property, a licensor’s rejection of a trademark license deprives its licensee of any right to continued use of the mark.

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Violations of the Automatic Stay and the Discharge Injunction

This panel will discuss current developments in the law in the First and Second Circuits for both violations of the automatic stay and discharge injunction. We will analyze the unique consequences debtors may face when filing for bankruptcy and what might or might not violate the automatic stay (e.g., revocation of a driver’s license after an uninsured motorist files), and how corporations are able to address stay violations.

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Other Nonbankruptcy Alternatives: Exchange Offers, Strict Foreclosures and Workouts

ABCs and state receiverships are not the only chapter 11 alternatives. With even middle-market companies having widely held and tradeable note instruments, the exchange offer provides an out-of-court alternative that, if successful, can provide most of the benefits of a confirmed chapter 11 plan, and if unsuccessful, can still provide the basis for a confirmable prepackaged plan. The panel will provide an introduction to exchange offers: the goals, mechanics and documents.

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Welcome to the New Age: Don’t Be Radioactive (or a Cybersecurity Victim)

Lawyers and law firms, as well as other professionals, need to understand the critical issue of data security. This panel will detail why you are at risk and what you should be doing to combat the threats. The focus will be on understanding cybersecurity risks, data-protection best practices, incident-response planning and ethical obligations. This plenary program will offer practical guidance that you can use both personally and professionally, whether focused principally on consumer or commercial issues.

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Student Loans: How Do We Deal with Them Before and After Bankruptcy?

It is estimated that U.S. student debt obligations now exceed $1.5 trillion. This panel will discuss the impact of student loans before and after the borrower files bankruptcy. What can an attorney do to assist his/her client in determining his/her options with student loan obligations? How can a student loan be modified, and what can be done outside the courtroom for the borrower?

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Achieving Consensus in Bankruptcy Disputes Through Mediation

In this program, three expert mediators, two retired judges and one federal judicial mediator will provide insights on what to expect in a mediation of a dispute in a contested matter or adversary proceeding in a bankruptcy case.

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Not Your Parents’ Fraudulent-Transfer Action

Practitioners are constantly looking for ways to expand, or limit, the ability of estate fiduciaries and creditors to avoid transfers. This panel will explore several cutting-edge issues with respect to fraudulent-transfer actions currently playing out in bankruptcy courts, including whether trustees may recover tuition payments by debtor-parents for the benefit of their adult children and the meaning of “reasonably equivalent value” under Section 548(A)(1)(b).

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Access to Bankruptcy Justice: Expanding Opportunities (Ethics Panel)

Individuals with disabilities or with limited English proficiency often require accommodations to successfully access the relief afforded by the bankruptcy system. This requirement applies whether individuals are debtors or creditors. The panelists will discuss accessibility issues and the provision of reasonable accommodations to enable debtors or creditors with differing abilities to access the bankruptcy system.

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