Professional Compensation/Fees

Unlocking Gating Issues in Potential Debtor Engagements

This panel will discuss several threshold issues that should be considered when determining whether you can and should represent a potential debtor client, including (1) whether you can ethically and legally be retained, (2) how you can be compensated for your work, (3) whether your potential client has the requisite corporate authority, and (4) reasons to walk away from an engagement before it’s too late. The panelists will highlight real-life examples and provide best practices and pitfalls to avoid with respect to these issues.

$125.00
$125.00

Business Bankruptcy Legal Update

This panel will discuss the impact of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 on bankruptcy cases, the latest automatic stay cases, employment of professionals and fee applications, and § 363 sales in the Zoom era.

$125.00
$125.00

Judicial Roundtable (2021 Rocky Mountain Bankruptcy Conference)

The judges of this year's Rocky Mountain Bankruptcy Conference will hold in-depth discussions on navigating virtual hearings and what we have learned from the pandemic; the benefits of filing commercial cases in Rocky Mountain jurisdictions; gross-income calculations in light of the closures of small, closely held businesses; trends in consumer/small business cases during the pandemic; and ethics and professionalism in a (more) virtual world.

$125.00
$125.00

Ethics: Telling the Story on Your Timesheets: A Fee Examiner’s Tips for Creditors’ Lawyers and Bankruptcy Estate Professionals

We often forget that what we say and how we say it can signal more than we intended. One of the primary ways in which "what we say"/"how we say it" creates such signals is with the wording of time entries, whether or not those time entries are ever reviewed by a bankruptcy court. Clients read bills, too, so if one wants to communicate that their work was valuable and efficiently performed, the fable of Goldilocks comes to mind: The time entries need to be "just right." When they're not, clients and courts can draw conclusions that we never intended them to draw.

$125.00
$125.00

Money Talks: Getting Retained and Paid (Ethically) by the Bankruptcy Estate

Presented by the Young and New Members & Ethics and Professional Compensation Committees
You work hard for the money, so let’s make sure you get it. This panel will discuss ethical considerations governing that all-important process: getting retained and paid by the bankruptcy estate. Aside from covering the basics of retention for young and new professionals, the panelists will address some of the myriad ethical issues governing retention and compensation that can arise, including connection disclosures, concurrent representations of insiders and expense reimbursement.

$125.00
$125.00

Money Talks: Getting Retained and Paid (Ethically) by the Bankruptcy Estate

Presented by the Young and New Members & Ethics and Professional Compensation Committees

$125.00
$125.00

Hot Topics with Bill Rochelle (2020 Virtual Winter Leadership Conference)

What are the hottest topics in bankruptcy law? This panel of experts, moderated by ABI Editor-at-Large Bill Rochelle, will discuss and analyze current business and consumer bankruptcy law cases.

$125.00
$125.00

Views from the Bench: Ethics

This session will highlight several of the Rules of Professional Conduct, including RPC 1.5 (Fees); the Alix/McKinsey litigation; RPC 3.3 (Candor to Tribunal); RPC 4.1 (Truthfulness to Others); the U.S. Trustee guidelines concerning retainers; RPC 7.1 (Communications Concerning a Lawyer’s Services); overbilling, RPC 8.4 (Misconduct); fee examiners, RPC 1.3 (Diligence); disclosures, Bankruptcy Rule 2014; RPC 1.7 (Conflict of Interest); and RPC 7.3 (Solicitation of Clients).

$125.00
$125.00

NABT: A Day in the Life of a Trustee (Comparisons of Chapter 7 and Sub V Trustees)

A better understanding of what trustees do in their day-to-day work can help debtors and credit and finance professionals appreciate some of the complexities of the bankruptcy process. Bankruptcy trustees are often painted as the bad guys: Creditors sometimes think that trustees sell assets at bargain-basement prices for a quick result, or that they're only in it for the fees, and debtors may view the trustee as their arch enemy. But the role of bankruptcy trustees is very challenging, involving and rewarding — not to mention highly regulated.

$125.00
$125.00

NO CLE - NCBJ: Ethics: Now that You’re Employed, Here's How to Avoid Stubbing Your Ethical Toe

Finally, you think you have the case of your dreams. How do you manage to navigate employment before the bankruptcy court? How do you ensure that you get paid and that neither you nor your client do anything to jeopardize your fees or your reputation? Join this discussion with an esteemed panel and numerous bankruptcy judges in breakout rooms as we discuss the often-confusing ethical issues that present themselves in employment.

Free Session

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